Thursday, August 04, 2005

Charleston Yachting

Charleston Yachting
Wednesday Night Race 4 Series 2:

Hoodoo Crew: Ric, Deb, Rando, Dan, Katy, Ben, Jim, Randy

Wind 7-11 knots ESE; Current Flooding
Course #9 8.5 NM BP, R2, BP, R2, R4 Finish

The first leg to BP was a fetch with our TWA at about 60 degrees. The dock end of the line was slightly favored so goal was to start down to leeward in clear air and make sure we were on the line with speed. The rest of the class tended to favor the windward pin end of the line allowing us and Emocean (J120, to leeward) to get off the line with good speed. Emocean quickly worked out and away while we consolidated and sailed up in front the class. Emocean rounded BP first while we followed in second about four boat lengths behind. We rounded BP and went very hard on the wind (almost pinching) to make sure we were to windward of the boats rounding BP behind us. We felt the right side was going to have better current relief and the wind direction was expected to shift right as well. If we could maintain our height the boats rounding after us would have to tack off to the left to clear their air. We succeeded and Emocean and Hoodoo continued up the right as long as we had enough water. Meanwhile Temptress (SR33OB) continued off to the left. Emocean was first to tack back left (I don’t think they have working depth sounder) while we had some more room we continued right towards the James Island shore. We tacked well inside of Emocean and started sailing back out on starboard tack, unfortunately the wind was now swinging left giving Temptress some significant leverage and we forced to continue on starboard while looking for more space to tack back to right. We were holding our own against Emocean but Temptress was now leading on the left. We dug back to right and tacked backed left short of the starboard tack layline. With the incoming current it was too difficult to call the layline at a distance so we worked back and got the left of Temptress and Emocean setting up about 50 yards to leeward of the layline. We had to duck the starboard tack Emocean and rounded R2 in third with Temptress clear ahead in first. Emocean jibe set at R2 while we bored away and set. We gained on Emocean and they proceeded to jibe back to leeward of us onto starboard. We continued down the run to close to Middle Ground and jibe over to port to back into the more favorable current. We jibed two more times staying the middle of course while Temptress worked the right and Emocean went to starboard tack layline. Temptress extended her lead to about 2 minutes while Emocean kept her one boat length lead over us. In our second rounding of BP the jib halyard was accidentally released causing Hoodoo to sail low while we sorted things out giving several boat lengths back to Emocean. We continued to work the right sided of the course and the wind was now lighting up to about 8 knots. We used our backstay tension to adjust the entry of genoa easing in the light stuff and tensioning in the puffs, it was obvious the velocity of the wind was trending down. Hoodoo excels upwind in winds under 10 and we closed in on Emocean. Three quarters up the second beat Emocean crossed Hoodoo and tacked to cover but tacked too late allowing Hoodoo to sail through. We felt we wanted the left and we tucked up under Emocean sending them back to right. Unfortunately there was more breeze back to the right and Emocean was able to cross us easily as we came back towards the starboard tack layline. We tacked onto starboard a little too quickly and the combination of bad air from Emocean and incoming current we had to shoot the mark to avoid tacking again. We rounded and had a nice bare away set with Emocean a good five to seven boat lengths ahead. We seemed to sail a little deeper and closed on Emocean I did not feel we would be able sail around her to weather so we just stayed close knowing that they give us a couple minutes on corrected time. I think as the wind lightened both Hoodoo and Emocean where both guilty of sailing too deep. We eventually jibed onto port in search of more favorable current and Emocean followed a minute later. We gained initially than Emocean appeared to have slightly been breeze to the right. Meanwhile Temptress sailed all the way to the port tack layline maybe even over standing a bit but still managing to put another minute on us. We approached R4 from the starboard tack layline several boat lengths behind Emocean. The leg from R4 to the finish was a beam reach that had enough velocity to allow Emocean to leg out slightly and beat us across the finish line by 25 seconds. With the wind velocity on a downward trend the leads boat only got richer as the night progressed and we easily saved our time over the third place boat Wrinkles (Olsen 30).

The keys to the race as with most, was the start and first leg to BP. If you can get to BP in clear air ahead of the traffic you have much better control strategically and tactically. Keep you eye on the wind pressure sailing out of pressure against an adverse current is a killer. A pretty famous sailor once said racing sailboats is easy “get out in front and extend your lead”. Nice job Temptress.


Randy Draftz
www.charlestonyacting.com

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I am writing because I saw your writeup of Race 4 series 2, and love Tactical discussion and banter. While I agree with a lot of what you were looking at I thought I would let you know how we pulled our Houdini.

Thanks to a non-yeilding windward boat (at the start, again…) we were forced into a bad position straight away. With Wrinkles hell bent to bury us (wonder why?) The best we could do was waterline out with them to BP and watch you and Emo take the early lead. You guys did a great job protecting the right and sure enough we had to tack away from what I thought to be the favored side of the course. The wind had been trending right all afternoon, but we had noticed before the start that the velocity positive shifts were back to the left, closer to the forecast direction and strength. We believed we were experiencing a thermal mixing, and that one breeze or the other would win out before a true dying trend ensued.

With the tide ebbing we were comfortable with an initial tack out left. The ebb flow off of Castle Pinkney is extremely strong during that stage of ebb, and the direction vs our course provided a lee bow effect showing big left. The problem for Emo was that what shows on the water does not necessarily tell the story. We were watching breeze right of median and holding on to a nice open lane assisted mainly by the current. At the first cross, despite the chunk we were able to take out of Emo and Hdoo’s lead it was Emo who took a close cover and forced back out left. We still were looking at a right trend and didn’t mind spending time on starboard! But right about then we saw puff showing on the left upper and part of the course, so out towards pressure we go.

I have seen boat after boat try to master the eddies and swirls East of NOAA and play the beach route. Willy does it like it is his job to do it, current going in or out. Sometimes I see the thermal puffs come rollin’ on, and when he shoots the moon with his layline it is sometimes brilliant. I however have favored the stronger rips between the anchorage bouy and our perennial mark. Tremendous water comes rushing off the mid harbor flat during late Ebb, causing SOG’s and COG’s to dance the night away. However, going back the KISS tactics model I choose to stay “close in the cone,” or limit the number of lanes outside of your projected laylines by tacking more often near the mark and not steaking one side or the other. Get the LAST shift will win at the WM as long as you are “in the time zone” of the corner bangers.

So we choose a stbd approach about ten lanes short of layline and put the blinders on David and made him steer to SOG/COG instead of watch the tell tales (drives helmsmen nuts, there is no feel and visual feedback is bad.) We crossed the near current line to the ebb rip near the top of the flats and saw SOG spike to 8.2. With boatspeed fighting to stay at 6.0 we felt pretty good. A nice big lefty to tack on helped heaps, coupled with the drop in velocity to the right- direction or not.

The first run is really where we got all our time. The beat was nice because we were able to play some games with Emo, acting pissed about being forced back to the left and watching current help increase for us as well as pressure. The lefty hit in earnest at T-now on the port tack line as we rounded the mark and with the right kite (we carry 3 VMG’s) and used the puff to get up on the flats. We had to do so crossing the most adverse of currents, but as we learned at CRW in the last race that area is one of extremes. 70 Seconds later we were across the next line and watched SOG jump from 4.2 to 5.7. There was another ridge of current less than ten boatlengths away, but every time we bumped it we would drop .5 or so OTB. The COG was also a big help. A couple of times we would see our course deviate by 20 degrees W, probably casued by the forementioned runoffs from the harbor flats. We would just reach right through them and in 60 seconds or so we would see the COG come back into line, and keep the SOG up as well. But by Hdoo and Emo staying (not necessarily in better or worse current- just different) in the channel and sailing more rhumbline they failed to hold onto the lefty as it tends to die towards the JI shore. As our AWA/AWS delta would shrink we would head up and power through the lulls. Emo and Hdoo had a good opportunity for a tight cover in the last downwind exchange after middle ground when we came back shy of the rhumbline. But looking back at the current now ripping off the lee shore of CP we gybed back out for the leebow current (upwind and down, as it turned out.) We were able to stay in the AWA range of the med. VMG and use the COG offset to make bearing on the mark. Hdoo and Emo played back to the JI shore side of rhumbline, we got velocity and current help (call it a shift to the crew, they feel better when I do that rather than explaining all the spaghetti soup) and added 60-80 seconds on the last exchange alone.

The second beat was a bit different than the first. We used simple corralling to keep Emo (and in effect you guys) herding right towards the lulls (and lifts) near the shore. Once we had you committed we loose covered EMo up the beat and repeated our DW technique. It was a little different, and a different angle (more right) so we changed to the light VMG. Good thing we did--- we did overstand the last DW layline and needed a very flat sail indeed to get there. But while doing so we held on to the proverbial “last puff” and were able to ride a strong puff to finish, rich get richer.

I find it fascinating looking at the thought processes of other boats, and in examining what we did right or wrong tactically. I have learned a couple of key tactical lessons in Charleston’s predominantly cat 2 (Walker) conditions. First is usually what you said- get a good start and be first to BP. That helps. But it is not the be all! Identifying while on that leg the first, second, and likely third shift will help anyone to link-em together. Simply choosing a side doesn’t work consistently enough here due to the changes in current speed and direction in the same places at the same stage in ebb or flood! I also learned through competing with the Melges boat to boat that downwind you have to, have to, have to VMG your way around the course. There are too many gains for being “over here or over there” to sail the VMG rhumblines. We fight the trends daily to not pinch near the WM and not foot into the LM.

So I would say our rule #1 is to get to BP smart. If we tank the start we will choose to hold covered or tack for clear based on the herd around us. Tacking away seldom works. We have a bunch of 2’s and 3’s from OCS or worse positions- and a few bullets. Then, should we be ahead, in the pack, or behind we consider the race to re-start at BP. We used to do a drill a lot at CoC and PG called “last beat” or “move-up” where boats would round the last leeward in order and then try to hold or move up. Then do it again with the lead boat going back to the back of the pack, etc… I have been amazed at what leverage out of or into corners will do regardless of the size of a lead. So if you can break free and not be wrong you can set up lots of neat situations. Other boats begin to question phase, or forget about it, and try to stop the bleeding by converging. Whether ahead or behind converging allows for restart of leverage and thus opportunity to defend or attack based on the rest of the fleet. With that race a three pony race and you and Emo in phase together, we just played the little leverage to what we saw on the water.

Second is to maximize the corners. Everyone says it, no one does it. Starboard tack or gybe always has rights at a mark. Period. Who do folks set up on port all the time? Or slow down going into marks? It leaves the door open for attack. The inability to safely defend a legal attack is not grounds for protest under “not enough time.” SO, only dish out what you can defend. Mostly for us it is pre-calculating our exit angle and executing the turn on three levels. The helm, the sails, and the crew weight. You should never come out of a set any slower at any time from your upwind speed (some extreme cases do not apply.) Problems with the kite mean you don’t have one and you had better head up and use what you do! It takes WAY longer for a sailboat to accelerate than decelerate (save skiffs) so at the very least don’t round with less speed than you had! Passing through three reaching angles (close, beam, broad) during your turn the trimmers should be 1-2-3 and accelerate enough to hold speed all the way to exit angle. Leeward marks are the same way. You have to go from DW or VMG through three reaching angles before you get to upwind. How could you not accelerate? Planning and executing the turn independently of the sail change team (and sometimes independently of those who are trimming what you’ve got working) gets the skippers eyes out of the boat and heading the right direction regardless of what else is going on! I have coached through it a thousand times. A hard genoa on the turn will stop you. A hard main before the turn will stop you and your ability to accelerate. When your bow peeks through to the windward side of the leeward mark you should already be close hauled and 10-15% above target. Do that and you can defend your lane AND extend. So to that end attacking at marks means last minute decisions about disrupting the boat aheads ability to execute cleanly without fouling (very hard.) Defending can mean slowing down to draw your competition in so close that they are faster, overtaking, and must yield to leeward (goal accomplished) or into deceleration mode (goal accomplished.) If we can do it cleaner we close the deltas or expand them on our dime (instead of letting the course and the fleet control us) then we are controlling our destiny and keeping our close competition looking at us instead of the sparse clews our racing area provides…

Lastly is most of what I do on the water. Series and race management. Do we break away from a cover to chase Hdoo when they have us where we can’t get out? Only if there is nothing to loose. Otherwise I will weight the pro’s and cons. I usually do this well before each race so we have a game plan of who to watch, who to beat, and who to attack, defend, or cover. Series management can change the tactical call to tight cover, loose cover, cross, duck- or how to defend against it! Early in the series I try to take less risks. If consistency pays even major mistakes in the middle or the end of the series won’t cost you much. And everyone is chasing you. Being chased is not scary in a sailboat. The worst thing that will happen to you when someone catches you is tight cover, loose cover, cross, or duck. If you can defend each situation by positioning the tack or duck closer to the anticipated shift than the boat attacking you simply re-start leverage one leg up. I tend to be most aggressive in the middle of a series. If you can deliver a knock out punch in race 3 or 4 of a six race series you can be conservative and ride boathandling home to victory while the dogs eat each other all round you. But once series management thoughts are gone I spend 90+ percent of my time playing leverages and staying in pressure. The current plays enough of a factor here I don’t stress over lifts and headers. I take the lifts, and will sail into a header deep before I commit. I try to keep one lane free towards the side I expect a shift or current help. I will let a windward boat or leeward boat in close quarters hang there indefinitely so long as they do not threaten our escape route to the next mark or shift. Once we are committed on laylines or towards a shift we do our best to slow others down (maximize the corners) or force them away from marks or shifts. Repeat #2 and #3 until the gun goes off.

Harbor racing is almost it’s own sport. Even CRW windward/leewards are so current effected that ignoring it often beats convincing yourself you are gaining or loosing because of it. Out in the ocean, up on the Chessy, or even a KWRW or Miami the “current” deltas between max and min on the course is less than 1 knot (usually less than .5 knots) and one side is almost always obviously favored. Significant? Yes! Don’t ignore it. Harbor racing is an ever changing track. The bottom shifts faster than NOAA or the Pilots can log it. The land effects for the breeze are compounded inshore by things you can’t see.

Feel free to banter about at will. The number of folks to talk to that understand what leverage is, how to control it, what effects tactics and strategy, etc… round here is very small indeed!

Randy Draftz said...

I am writing because I saw your writeup of Race 4 series 2, and love Tactical discussion and banter. While I agree with a lot of what you were looking at I thought I would let you know how we pulled our Houdini.

Thanks to a non-yeilding windward boat (at the start, again…) we were forced into a bad position straight away. With Wrinkles hell bent to bury us (wonder why?) The best we could do was waterline out with them to BP and watch you and Emo take the early lead. You guys did a great job protecting the right and sure enough we had to tack away from what I thought to be the favored side of the course. The wind had been trending right all afternoon, but we had noticed before the start that the velocity positive shifts were back to the left, closer to the forecast direction and strength. We believed we were experiencing a thermal mixing, and that one breeze or the other would win out before a true dying trend ensued.

With the tide ebbing we were comfortable with an initial tack out left. The ebb flow off of Castle Pinkney is extremely strong during that stage of ebb, and the direction vs our course provided a lee bow effect showing big left. The problem for Emo was that what shows on the water does not necessarily tell the story. We were watching breeze right of median and holding on to a nice open lane assisted mainly by the current. At the first cross, despite the chunk we were able to take out of Emo and Hdoo’s lead it was Emo who took a close cover and forced back out left. We still were looking at a right trend and didn’t mind spending time on starboard! But right about then we saw puff showing on the left upper and part of the course, so out towards pressure we go.

I have seen boat after boat try to master the eddies and swirls East of NOAA and play the beach route. Willy does it like it is his job to do it, current going in or out. Sometimes I see the thermal puffs come rollin’ on, and when he shoots the moon with his layline it is sometimes brilliant. I however have favored the stronger rips between the anchorage bouy and our perennial mark. Tremendous water comes rushing off the mid harbor flat during late Ebb, causing SOG’s and COG’s to dance the night away. However, going back the KISS tactics model I choose to stay “close in the cone,” or limit the number of lanes outside of your projected laylines by tacking more often near the mark and not steaking one side or the other. Get the LAST shift will win at the WM as long as you are “in the time zone” of the corner bangers.

So we choose a stbd approach about ten lanes short of layline and put the blinders on David and made him steer to SOG/COG instead of watch the tell tales (drives helmsmen nuts, there is no feel and visual feedback is bad.) We crossed the near current line to the ebb rip near the top of the flats and saw SOG spike to 8.2. With boatspeed fighting to stay at 6.0 we felt pretty good. A nice big lefty to tack on helped heaps, coupled with the drop in velocity to the right- direction or not.

The first run is really where we got all our time. The beat was nice because we were able to play some games with Emo, acting pissed about being forced back to the left and watching current help increase for us as well as pressure. The lefty hit in earnest at T-now on the port tack line as we rounded the mark and with the right kite (we carry 3 VMG’s) and used the puff to get up on the flats. We had to do so crossing the most adverse of currents, but as we learned at CRW in the last race that area is one of extremes. 70 Seconds later we were across the next line and watched SOG jump from 4.2 to 5.7. There was another ridge of current less than ten boatlengths away, but every time we bumped it we would drop .5 or so OTB. The COG was also a big help. A couple of times we would see our course deviate by 20 degrees W, probably casued by the forementioned runoffs from the harbor flats. We would just reach right through them and in 60 seconds or so we would see the COG come back into line, and keep the SOG up as well. But by Hdoo and Emo staying (not necessarily in better or worse current- just different) in the channel and sailing more rhumbline they failed to hold onto the lefty as it tends to die towards the JI shore. As our AWA/AWS delta would shrink we would head up and power through the lulls. Emo and Hdoo had a good opportunity for a tight cover in the last downwind exchange after middle ground when we came back shy of the rhumbline. But looking back at the current now ripping off the lee shore of CP we gybed back out for the leebow current (upwind and down, as it turned out.) We were able to stay in the AWA range of the med. VMG and use the COG offset to make bearing on the mark. Hdoo and Emo played back to the JI shore side of rhumbline, we got velocity and current help (call it a shift to the crew, they feel better when I do that rather than explaining all the spaghetti soup) and added 60-80 seconds on the last exchange alone.

The second beat was a bit different than the first. We used simple corralling to keep Emo (and in effect you guys) herding right towards the lulls (and lifts) near the shore. Once we had you committed we loose covered EMo up the beat and repeated our DW technique. It was a little different, and a different angle (more right) so we changed to the light VMG. Good thing we did--- we did overstand the last DW layline and needed a very flat sail indeed to get there. But while doing so we held on to the proverbial “last puff” and were able to ride a strong puff to finish, rich get richer.

I find it fascinating looking at the thought processes of other boats, and in examining what we did right or wrong tactically. I have learned a couple of key tactical lessons in Charleston’s predominantly cat 2 (Walker) conditions. First is usually what you said- get a good start and be first to BP. That helps. But it is not the be all! Identifying while on that leg the first, second, and likely third shift will help anyone to link-em together. Simply choosing a side doesn’t work consistently enough here due to the changes in current speed and direction in the same places at the same stage in ebb or flood! I also learned through competing with the Melges boat to boat that downwind you have to, have to, have to VMG your way around the course. There are too many gains for being “over here or over there” to sail the VMG rhumblines. We fight the trends daily to not pinch near the WM and not foot into the LM.

So I would say our rule #1 is to get to BP smart. If we tank the start we will choose to hold covered or tack for clear based on the herd around us. Tacking away seldom works. We have a bunch of 2’s and 3’s from OCS or worse positions- and a few bullets. Then, should we be ahead, in the pack, or behind we consider the race to re-start at BP. We used to do a drill a lot at CoC and PG called “last beat” or “move-up” where boats would round the last leeward in order and then try to hold or move up. Then do it again with the lead boat going back to the back of the pack, etc… I have been amazed at what leverage out of or into corners will do regardless of the size of a lead. So if you can break free and not be wrong you can set up lots of neat situations. Other boats begin to question phase, or forget about it, and try to stop the bleeding by converging. Whether ahead or behind converging allows for restart of leverage and thus opportunity to defend or attack based on the rest of the fleet. With that race a three pony race and you and Emo in phase together, we just played the little leverage to what we saw on the water.

Second is to maximize the corners. Everyone says it, no one does it. Starboard tack or gybe always has rights at a mark. Period. Who do folks set up on port all the time? Or slow down going into marks? It leaves the door open for attack. The inability to safely defend a legal attack is not grounds for protest under “not enough time.” SO, only dish out what you can defend. Mostly for us it is pre-calculating our exit angle and executing the turn on three levels. The helm, the sails, and the crew weight. You should never come out of a set any slower at any time from your upwind speed (some extreme cases do not apply.) Problems with the kite mean you don’t have one and you had better head up and use what you do! It takes WAY longer for a sailboat to accelerate than decelerate (save skiffs) so at the very least don’t round with less speed than you had! Passing through three reaching angles (close, beam, broad) during your turn the trimmers should be 1-2-3 and accelerate enough to hold speed all the way to exit angle. Leeward marks are the same way. You have to go from DW or VMG through three reaching angles before you get to upwind. How could you not accelerate? Planning and executing the turn independently of the sail change team (and sometimes independently of those who are trimming what you’ve got working) gets the skippers eyes out of the boat and heading the right direction regardless of what else is going on! I have coached through it a thousand times. A hard genoa on the turn will stop you. A hard main before the turn will stop you and your ability to accelerate. When your bow peeks through to the windward side of the leeward mark you should already be close hauled and 10-15% above target. Do that and you can defend your lane AND extend. So to that end attacking at marks means last minute decisions about disrupting the boat aheads ability to execute cleanly without fouling (very hard.) Defending can mean slowing down to draw your competition in so close that they are faster, overtaking, and must yield to leeward (goal accomplished) or into deceleration mode (goal accomplished.) If we can do it cleaner we close the deltas or expand them on our dime (instead of letting the course and the fleet control us) then we are controlling our destiny and keeping our close competition looking at us instead of the sparse clews our racing area provides…

Lastly is most of what I do on the water. Series and race management. Do we break away from a cover to chase Hdoo when they have us where we can’t get out? Only if there is nothing to loose. Otherwise I will weight the pro’s and cons. I usually do this well before each race so we have a game plan of who to watch, who to beat, and who to attack, defend, or cover. Series management can change the tactical call to tight cover, loose cover, cross, duck- or how to defend against it! Early in the series I try to take less risks. If consistency pays even major mistakes in the middle or the end of the series won’t cost you much. And everyone is chasing you. Being chased is not scary in a sailboat. The worst thing that will happen to you when someone catches you is tight cover, loose cover, cross, or duck. If you can defend each situation by positioning the tack or duck closer to the anticipated shift than the boat attacking you simply re-start leverage one leg up. I tend to be most aggressive in the middle of a series. If you can deliver a knock out punch in race 3 or 4 of a six race series you can be conservative and ride boathandling home to victory while the dogs eat each other all round you. But once series management thoughts are gone I spend 90+ percent of my time playing leverages and staying in pressure. The current plays enough of a factor here I don’t stress over lifts and headers. I take the lifts, and will sail into a header deep before I commit. I try to keep one lane free towards the side I expect a shift or current help. I will let a windward boat or leeward boat in close quarters hang there indefinitely so long as they do not threaten our escape route to the next mark or shift. Once we are committed on laylines or towards a shift we do our best to slow others down (maximize the corners) or force them away from marks or shifts. Repeat #2 and #3 until the gun goes off.

Harbor racing is almost it’s own sport. Even CRW windward/leewards are so current effected that ignoring it often beats convincing yourself you are gaining or loosing because of it. Out in the ocean, up on the Chessy, or even a KWRW or Miami the “current” deltas between max and min on the course is less than 1 knot (usually less than .5 knots) and one side is almost always obviously favored. Significant? Yes! Don’t ignore it. Harbor racing is an ever changing track. The bottom shifts faster than NOAA or the Pilots can log it. The land effects for the breeze are compounded inshore by things you can’t see.

Feel free to banter about at will. The number of folks to talk to that understand what leverage is, how to control it, what effects tactics and strategy, etc… round here is very small indeed!

Henry McCray (Temptress)

whip said...

Hi there! Very interesting blog. I'll add it to my favorites.
Best Regards,
whip

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